Razor blade doughnut makers fight to keep razor blades in doughnuts

Yuri Slatskovlaki is a Latvian gourmet chef and pastry artist in Utah. For years, his cooking has set the standard for the niche Latvian cuisine industry in the United States.

For years, his pastry shop has been famous for an item called “vinsidzek mus,” which roughly translates to “injury roll.” Over the years, the dish has been more commonly referred to as “razor blade doughnuts.” This is because the pastry is shaped similarly to a doughnut, and is filled with fragments of razor blades.

Vinsidzek mus is a hot seller for Slatskovlaki. However the old-world delicacy, dating back to some horrible time in Latvia’s history, has caused alarm with state law makers. There is now a state ban on the pastries, which could lead to a nation-wide ripple effect. A federal ban could be levied at any time.

“The vinsidzek mus, it is a traditional food,” explains Yuri. “It goes back to when feudal lords would generously provide leftover desert items to the poor and starving. Some would say it was intentional that the deserts were transported in the same crates as scrap metal from the blacksmith’s shop, but regardless, the people reveled in the sweetness that the treats would bring, moments before dying. But that would’ve happened anyway, so the death was much nicer.”

The state ban on the items is perplexing to Slatskovlaki: “We are completely upfront about there being razor blades in the doughnuts. It’s not like we’re trying to win a lawsuit or something.”

“I honor my great-great-grandparent’s memory with every bite,” claims Paula Gerchek, a local woman of Latvian descent. “Every time I feel a trail of blood dripping down my throat, I smile and think about those people I never met or knew. It gives me an odd sense of purpose for no discernible reason.”

Dr Johannesburg Swivel

Dr Johannesburg Swivel

I'd very much like to stick my fingers inside you. - Author Bio

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